Quoted – Gen Y moms prefer digital, rather than face-to-face, communication more than their older cohorts.

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Gen Y moms prefer digital, rather than face-to-face, communication more than their older cohorts.

Mothers are more connected online than the average woman, with younger moms especially committed to digital communication, says a report examining moms and online behavior. More than 90 percent of U.S. women with children under age 18 in the household are online, compared with roughly three-quarters (76.3 percent) of all adult women. Mothers of Generation Y, however, are even more involved in online communication than their older counterparts, with nearly one in five (17 percent) stating that they use email or Facebook to communicate with immediate family—with “immediate family” defined as family members living in the same household.

 

While Baby Boomer moms said that they communicated with family members in person most of the time (an average of 62 percent face-to-face communication), Generation X mothers stated they do so 58 percent of the time, says the report. Gen Y moms said that their face-to-face communication with immediate family averages just less than half the time at 48 percent. Boomer moms are also less likely to use Facebook as often as their younger cohorts do, while one in five (19 percent) of Gen Y moms reported that they spend at least two hours a day on the social networking site.

 

 

Marketing consultant Dr. Scott Testa, also a professor of business administration at Philadelphia-based Cabrini College, says that he has also observed this fast-moving trend.

“Generation [Y] and [the mom] demographic is rapidly moving to electronic media,” he notes. “In order to reach these moms [companies] need to go digital.”

Singer warns marketers to not be too complacent when it comes to reaching out via social media.

“Too many marketers are sitting back and waiting to see how social media pans out, as though it’s a temporary phenomenon,” she explains. “But it’s as permanent and as influential as TV was in its infancy, and it will grow even more important. The more quickly that marketing executives learn to harness social media, the more likely they’ll come out ahead because of it.”

Testa agrees. “It is not a fad,” he adds. “Those companies that really get it could really target [this group] effectively.”

http://www.demodirt.com/index.php/generation-y-trends/consumer-spending/433-digital-age


 

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Quoted – Modern-day people watching

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Modern-day people watching

We are constantly peering into the lives of family, friends, strangers and even celebrities through different forms of media. Instead of sitting on a bench at the park, we’re now using the screens on our TVs, phones and computers to do our people watching.

“I think people like to live vicariously through other people,” says Scott Testa, media consultant and professor of business administration at Cabrini College in Philadelphia. “People like situations that maybe they wouldn’t do in their own lives, but they enjoy watching other people do it.”

It’s a form of escapism from your normal life. Testa says reality shows such as Jersey Shore can be appealing because of this train wreck factor — it’s a horrible sight, but you can’t look away. He says people subconsciously compare themselves to others, so knowing our lives aren’t as bad as some people on TV is a satisfying thought.

Testa says some characters who know they’re being watched might act in ways that aren’t consistent with their regular actions. He says although some reality shows might skew actual reality and behaviors, viewers respond to the exaggerated characters because they evoke strong emotions, which translate to the screen well. He says sometimes the more outrageous the behavior, the bigger the audience.

Social networking helps us get a closer sense of someone’s personality and has amplified our natural tendency to observe, Testa says. He says there are those who like to know everyone’s business and those who like to tell everyone their business, which makes Facebook perfect for those two groups.

But knowing other people’s business is not always a bad thing. Facebook is a platform where people can share a common interest. You may discover that you have more in common with a stranger than you think.

Instead of being shackled to your computer or TV screen, location awareness technology allows you to actually meet the people you are watching.

“By nature, we’re curious. We’re social,” Testa says. “When you take a medium that allows us to be more social and more curious when it comes to the activities of others, you’re going to have an audience.”

http://www.kansan.com/news/2010/mar/04/modern-day-people-watching/

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Quoted – How to Negotiate Just About Anything – The Faster Times

Taxi Negotiation
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Unlike Time Warner and Fox executives, or Democrats and Republicans, most folks eager to build personal wealth need skill in personal negotiations. Most days bring a boss who won’t approve a project, a store that won’t accept a returned product, or a child who refuses to clean up. And most situations can end with both sides happy (enough). Here’s how.

Take emotion out of the equation

However, says Scott Testa, a professor of business administration at Cabrini College, be prepared to walk away. “When you show emotion, it shows fear,” he explains. On that score, you can prosper by finding ways to disarm the adversary with cool.

What you don’t want to do, is to leave the table with a win-at-all-cost, says Testa. Be graceful. Go for the win-win.

And be ready to talk about just what “winning” means.

http://thefastertimes.com/personalfinance/2010/01/04/how-to-negotiate-just-about-anything/

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Quoted – The unstoppable Kevin Trudeau: Infamous infomercial king is at it again – Walletpop.com

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Even if you don’t know Kevin Trudeau by name, you’ll likely recognize his face. You’ve probably seen him while channel surfing during a bout of insomnia; he’s the perfectly coiffed guy who confidently explains to one or more women on his talk show style-infomercials about having the answers for all that worries you — from illness to money.

Trudeau is a legendary figure in the world of infomercials, with a charismatic approach that has won him a legion of followers. Over the years, he’s offered us advice on how to beat cancer, improve our memory, read faster, lose weight and straighten out our finances. Now he’s onto the next life-altering topic. Trudeau is currently saturating the infomercial airwaves with 30-minute segments about his latest book: “Free Money ‘They’ Don’t Want You to Know About.”

Trudeau has sold millions of books that dole out his expansive range of advice. Yet, one thing his adoring fans might not realize is that the charming pitchman on the television is also a convicted felon who has been slammed with an extraordinary series of sanctions by the FTC for allegedly misleading consumers. Currently, there is a $40 million-plus fine looming over Trudeau’s head in an ongoing court battle with the Federal Trade Commission. A judge even gave him the distinction of being the only pitchman banned from doing infomercials.

Trudeau has managed to turn the constant allegations by the government into a marketing tool. The more trouble he’s in, the more he looks like a hero speaking out against a vast government conspiracy intended to silence his powerful messages. His messages, he claims, are ones that the government doesn’t want you to know. In fact, the phrase “They don’t want you to know about” is incorporated into his most recent book titles.

“It’s a testament to his sales ability and naivete of the consumer. This is a person who time and time again has been targeted by different government agencies due to unsavory business practices and continues to sell product,” said Scott Testa, a marketing professor at Cabrini College outside Philadelphia.

http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2009/12/03/the-infamous-king-of-infomercials-kevin-trudeau-is-at-it-again/

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You Are Watching Captivate TV

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“You are watching Captivate tv.” – Sound familiar? Been on an elevator lately? If so then more than likely you are one of the millions of people ambushed by the unique advertising of Captivate TV. Captivate TV is a brand of information service hitting the airwaves on little tv monitors in….the elevator of all places. As a unique form of guerilla marketing Captivate TV hits its target where and when he/she least expects it in a most unexpected form. Yes, while the elevator rider can catch up on sports scores, the weather, crime statistics, world news, popular court cases; he is also exposed to many ads! With Price Waterhouse reporting in Bloomberg on June 16, 2009 that ad revenue for radio and media are on the decline and given the latest statistics on dwindling newspaper ad revenue and dwindling newspaper sales, it is obvious that firms with the money to pay advertising dollars are looking for new and innovative ways to capture the attention of its audience. Why not take a chance on tvs on an elevator? Face it, people aren’t buying as many newspapers but everyone at one time or another has to ride an elevator.

What makes Captivate TV such a perfect advertising tool is that it lives up to its name. The rider is captivated, well mostly because the rider is captive. Where else can you go on an elevator in between floors? Is it too invasive? Of course not – the great component of this form of advertising is that the target (that would be the rider) doesn’t feel coerced. Obviously, people like choice – telemarketers who no longer have a job can confirm that a marketing campaign that pushes too hard can be a fatal mistake. There’s no sound so no one is forced to listen to annoying, intrusive ads. One actually chooses on his or her own free will to look at the monitor. What a psychologically genius innovation! Why? The monitor seems to serve as a source of relief. People are compelled to look at it and to read every word on the screen because the alternative is the uncomfortable awkward silence of an elevator filled with strangers. Captivate TV makes the “straightforward elevator glare” unnecessary.*

What ultimately makes Captivate TV a top-notch marketing tool is its ability to deceptively serve as a portal to vital information while slipping its viewer a mickey in the form of the newest movie trailer or a picture of the greatest cigar to smoke while golfing. It’s true, the elevator is no longer just transportation from one floor to another, it is now a source of everything one needs to know all in a concise neat package without the editorial bias generally attached to a newspaper or radio piece. Ever want to know the time, the weather, the highlights of Beyonce’s latest concert and the down-low on Taking of Pelham 123 or even the day’s stock market recap? Just find an elevator, the weather is on the lower left and the ads show up on the upper right – everything else is in between…bon appetite.

*100 Elevator riders polled at the Wanamaker Building, (Center City Philadelphia) and 100% of those polled habitually relied on the monitors daily

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