Quoted – Cheaper ways to get ink help keep businesses in the black

Ink tubes connected to the printer cartridges
Image via Wikipedia

While economists and business analysts have been busy fretting over the rate of the economic recovery, grossly focused on the latest jobs report, GDP figures and the inflation rate, maybe there is a more obvious indicator they should have been paying attention to all along: the ink cartridge business.

It’s something many businesses cannot live without: the ability to print checks, invoices, records and receipts.  And at prices ranging from $25 to $200 apiece, printer, ink and toner purchases can be among the more expensive for a company.

“If business is just down, you’re simply doing less printing,” stressed Scott Testa, professor of business administration at Cabrini College in Philadelphia.

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=167790

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The Death March of Newspapers

Print media is dying. They are blaming the current economy and the decline of advertising and classified sales as the culprit of their troubles. Here are some other factors that explain the downfall of the newspaper business.

Most newspapers are either very liberal or very conservative. Readers are growing weary of this. They want unbiased news reporting, not slant. By the way, network television news; better learn quickly from print media on this one before its too late for you too!

With the exception of the bi-fold newspapers, the “technology” and packaging has not changed in decades. Please name me one other “product” that has not evolved in what seems like forever.

Print media blames the Internet and cable news channels for their loss of business. To some point, there is truth in that, as the immediacy of the ‘net and cable is hard to challenge, unless, you actually provide your readers in-depth facts and knowledge that they cannot readily find elsewhere. Keep in mind that the Internet and cable news channels are also usually slanted, and only give superficial attention to the stories that they report on.

Today’s reporting is like politics, all about the “gotcha.” That’s not what readers want, but how many newspapers do you know that actively interact with their readers in a way that provides them with the needed feedback to better service their readers?

At some point, if printed media does want to survive, it must stop acting like the victim of a tragedy and instead start reacting like a boxer who has been hit with a body blow: get up, re-group, and fight back!

Update 12/24/08

Americans prefer news from Web to newspapers: survey

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