Quoted – Cheaper ways to get ink help keep businesses in the black

Ink tubes connected to the printer cartridges
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While economists and business analysts have been busy fretting over the rate of the economic recovery, grossly focused on the latest jobs report, GDP figures and the inflation rate, maybe there is a more obvious indicator they should have been paying attention to all along: the ink cartridge business.

It’s something many businesses cannot live without: the ability to print checks, invoices, records and receipts.  And at prices ranging from $25 to $200 apiece, printer, ink and toner purchases can be among the more expensive for a company.

“If business is just down, you’re simply doing less printing,” stressed Scott Testa, professor of business administration at Cabrini College in Philadelphia.

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=167790

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Quoted – Learning the Way of the Snow Leopard – MacNewsWorld

Updated photo of new signage at 1 Infinite Loo...
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When confronted with a new piece of technology, some users will jump right in, but others may want to learn from an expert how to get the most out of it. Class On Demand puts 13 lessons onto a DVD that Mac greenhorns can use straight from their new computers. However, as many vendors operating in the Apple universe have found, one of their biggest rivals may turn out to be Apple itself.

As many developers have learned, operating in the Apple universe can be an uncertain proposition because one never knows when one may be in a face off for market share with one’s benefactor. “Apple’s going to get more involved in training themselves,” Scott Testa a professor of business administration at Cabrini College in Philadelphia told to MacNewsWorld.

“They’re going to start wrapping around training more and more with the retail experience,” he continued. “You’re going to see stores that are larger and have a larger training component in them.”

“They see training as a business that’s complementary to the rest of the things they’re doing,” he added. “An educated customer is generally a better customer. The more educated your customers are in your products, the less chance you have of losing them.”

“That’s not going to make trainers happy,” he declared, “but the market is so large that Apple could in no way satisfy the whole demand in it.”

http://www.macnewsworld.com/story/Learning-the-Way-of-the-Snow-Leopard-68712.html

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