Quoted – Yuan expected to appreciate at snail’s pace

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The appreciation of the yuan initiated in June by China’s central bank has raised concerns among investors, especially regarding the impact on China’s major exporters.

However, experts agree that the immediate impacts of yuan re-valuation will be minimal as the Chinese government is expected to realize the appreciation through a series of minor steps.

The general economic principle dictates that a stronger yuan will have negative impacts on China’s export-led companies. However, Scott Testa, a professor of business administration at Cabrini College in Radnor, Pa., said the controlled pace of the appreciation will mitigate such impacts on China’s exporters.

“I do think it [impact of yuan valuation] will be minimal because I think it will be gradual and will give the exporters time to adjust to the new currency environment,” he said. “If it was something that would happen dramatically, it would hurt them more.”

http://medillmoneymavens.com/2010/08/25/yuan-expected-to-appreciate-at-snail’s-pace/

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Quoted – Fort Hood soldiers turn to social media – Fierce Government IT

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In the wake of the mass shooting that left 13 people dead and 30 wounded last week, soldiers and their families at Fort Hood turned to social networking to deal with the carnage that occurred in their backyard.

Social media gave people an opportunity to talk about what happened, and it allowed the military a chance to let people know that the base’s media relations office was answering questions as quickly as possible.

It comes at an ironic time because DoD has not decided whether to buy into the idea that social networking is a good way to communicate. Although the Pentagon has given the green light to some social media sites, it is still examining the potential threats and benefits associated with social networking for the military.

Scott Testa, a Cabrini College business professor with expertise in social media, told Federal Computer Week that it was natural to turn to social networking to communicate after the shotting attack. “You have a lot of people in the military that were raised on texting and now social media,” Testa said. “They’re not watching the network news; they’re getting all their news electronically.”

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Quoted – Military uses social media to share info on Fort Hood shootings – Federal Computer Week

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Facebook and Twitter quickly became a way to communicate during and after the attack

The Army’s public affairs staff at Fort Hood used Facebook today to publish a note saying the media relations office is inundated with requests and is answering queries as quickly as possible.

The post, which appeared on the Army’s official Facebook page, is just one way social media is being used in the wake of the mass shooting that left 13 people dead and at least 30 others wounded, according to the Army.

It is not surprising that so many people turned to social media first to communicate about the shootings, said Scott Testa, a Cabrini College business professor with expertise in social media.

“You have a lot of people in the military that were raised on texting and now social media,” Testa said. “They’re not watching the network news; they’re getting all their news electronically.”

Testa said he saw social media help clarify conflicting reports in the hours after the shootings. Individuals on the base were able to confirm or deny reports of lockdowns and other incidents via Twitter, he said.

While social media can help clear up conflicting reports, it also has the power to perpetuate false information, he said.

“That’s why the government has to put out info via these channels,” he said. “You can’t let it fester if the information is wrong; you have to respond to that.”

review of the benefits and risks of using social media within the Defense

http://fcw.com/articles/2009/11/06/fort-hood-social-media.aspx

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Quoted – Federal Computer Week – Social Media and Defense Department

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Quoted – Federal Computer Week – Social Media and Defense Department

DOD’s indecision on social-media tools continues

“During the early days of e-mail, the DOD — and other agencies that are very sensitive to security — was very nervous about having and using e-mail,” said Scott Testa, a professor of business at Cabrini College in Philadelphia. “After a while, when there was a comfort level, things loosened up.”

Testa said he expects the Marine Corps to ease its stance on social media and DOD to take further steps to secure the technology.

http://fcw.com/articles/2009/08/24/week-dod-social-media-debate.aspx

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